Creatina en la tercera edad

Foro general ciencia, medicina, nutrición, salud pública, política

Moderador: Fisio

Creatina en la tercera edad

Notapor Fisio » Dom, 05 Oct 2014, 17:34

Antes de usar fármacos que son de todo menos ciencia, la base debería ser el status nutricional y la bioenergética, y por supuesto las actividades sociales, el ejercicio y las terapias mente-cuerpo. El metabolismo del cerebro (la síntesis de neurotransmisores, etc) empieza con la nutrición (que sorpresa!). Y esta debería haber sido la base de la psicobiología, antes de la psicofarmacología que busca sintetizar artefactos químicos a ver si por serendipia hacen algo, y con suerte no machacan algún sistema por las infinitas serendipias desadaptativas de la farmacología que hay por cada serendipia funcional.

Mejoras a nivel cognitivo

Creatine supplementation and cognitive performance in elderly individuals.
McMorris T1, Mielcarz G, Harris RC, Swain JP, Howard A.
Author information
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of creatine supplementation on the cognitive performance of elderly people. Participants were divided into two groups, which were tested on random number generation, forward and backward number and spatial recall, and long-term memory tasks to establish a baseline level. Group 1 (n = 15) were given 5 g four times a day of placebo for 1 week, followed by the same dosage of creatine for the second week. Group 2 (n = 17) were given placebo both weeks. Participants were retested at the end of each week. Results showed a significant effect of creatine supplementation on all tasks except backward number recall. It was concluded that creatine supplementation aids cognition in the elderly.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17828627


Mejoras a nivel cognitivo

Use of creatine in the elderly and evidence for effects on cognitive function in young and old.
Rawson ES1, Venezia AC.
Author information

1Department of Exercise Science, 131 CEH, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA 17815, USA. erawson@bloomu.edu

Abstract

The ingestion of the dietary supplement creatine (about 20 g/day for 5 days or about 2 g/day for 30 days) results in increased skeletal muscle creatine and phosphocreatine. Subsequently, the performance of high-intensity exercise tasks, which rely heavily on the creatine-phosphocreatine energy system, is enhanced. The well documented benefits of creatine supplementation in young adults, including increased lean body mass, increased strength, and enhanced fatigue resistance are particularly important to older adults. With aging and reduced physical activity, there are decreases in muscle creatine, muscle mass, bone density, and strength. However, there is evidence that creatine ingestion may reverse these changes, and subsequently improve activities of daily living. Several groups have demonstrated that in older adults, short-term high-dose creatine supplementation, independent of exercise training, increases body mass, enhances fatigue resistance, increases muscle strength, and improves the performance of activities of daily living. Similarly, in older adults, concurrent creatine supplementation and resistance training increase lean body mass, enhance fatigue resistance, increase muscle strength, and improve performance of activities of daily living to a greater extent than resistance training alone. Additionally, creatine supplementation plus resistance training results in a greater increase in bone mineral density than resistance training alone. Higher brain creatine is associated with improved neuropsychological performance, and recently, creatine supplementation has been shown to increase brain creatine and phosphocreatine. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that cognitive processing, that is either experimentally (following sleep deprivation) or naturally (due to aging) impaired, can be improved with creatine supplementation. Creatine is an inexpensive and safe dietary supplement that has both peripheral and central effects. The benefits afforded to older adults through creatine ingestion are substantial, can improve quality of life, and ultimately may reduce the disease burden associated with sarcopenia and cognitive dysfunction.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21394604

Incluso sin ejercicio protege de atrofia muscular, fatiga, masa ósea y fuerza (my god si fuera un fármaco).

Creatine supplementation: can it improve quality of life in the elderly without associated resistance training?
Moon A, Heywood L, Rutherford S, Cobbold C1.
Author information
Abstract
INTRODUCTION:

Ageing is associated with decreased muscle mass, strength, power and function, and reduction in bone density and mineral content, leading to reduced independence and increased risk of falls. Creatine supplementation is reported to improve muscular strength and performance with training in younger athletes, and therefore could benefit older individuals.
AIMS:

This review critically appraises the current literature on whether creatine supplementation enhances muscular performance and function, body composition, bone mineral density and content in older adults without the addition of resistance training, and thus determines whether creatine supplementation can lead to an improved lifestyle for the sedentary elderly population.
RESULTS:

There is conflicting evidence regarding the usefulness of creatine supplementation in older subjects. Generally, however, creatine supplementation, without associated resistance training, seems to enhance muscular strength, power and endurance, increase lean body mass (LBM) and improve the functional capacity of the elderly. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that increased muscle mass due to creatine supplementation can result in increased local bone density. It appears that the effect of creatine supplementation is more beneficial in larger muscles and less effective in smaller muscles, however there are exceptions. The mechanism by which creatine supplementation works requires further research, however it is likely that the effects of creatine are related to creatine kinase activity, providing enhanced energy production for greater muscular contraction.
CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate that creatine supplementation without associated training in the elderly could potentially delay atrophy of muscle mass, improve endurance and strength, and increase bone strength, and thus may be a safe therapeutic strategy to help decrease loss in functional performance of everyday tasks.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24304199

Estado de ánimo y falta de sueño

Effect of creatine supplementation and sleep deprivation, with mild exercise, on cognitive and psychomotor performance, mood state, and plasma concentrations of catecholamines and cortisol.
McMorris T1, Harris RC, Swain J, Corbett J, Collard K, Dyson RJ, Dye L, Hodgson C, Draper N.
Author information
Abstract
RATIONALE:

Sleep deprivation has a negative effect on cognitive and psychomotor performance and mood state, partially due to decreases in creatine levels in the brain. Therefore, creatine supplementation should lessen the negative effects of sleep deprivation.
OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study was to examine the effect of creatine supplementation and sleep deprivation, with mild exercise, on cognitive and psychomotor performance, mood state, and plasma concentrations of catecholamines and cortisol.
METHOD:

Subjects were divided into a creatine group (n=10) and a placebo group (n=9). They took 5 g of creatine monohydrate or a placebo, dependent on their group, four times a time a day for 7 days, immediately prior to the experiment. The study was double blind. Subjects undertook tests of random movement generation (RMG), verbal and spatial recall, choice reaction time, static balance and mood state pre-test (0 h), after 6, 12 and 24 h of sleep deprivation, with intermittent exercise. They were tested for plasma concentrations of catecholamines and cortisol at 0 and 24 h.
RESULTS:

At 24 h, the creatine group demonstrated significantly less change in performance from 0 h (delta) in RMG, choice reaction time, balance and mood state. There were no significant differences between groups in plasma concentrations of catecholamines and cortisol. Norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations were significantly higher at 24 h than 0 h, but cortisol were lower.
CONCLUSIONS:

Following 24-h sleep deprivation, creatine supplementation had a positive effect on mood state and tasks that place a heavy stress on the prefrontal cortex.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16416332

Depresión en mujeres

A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of oral creatine monohydrate augmentation for enhanced response to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in women with major depressive disorder.
Lyoo IK1, Yoon S, Kim TS, Hwang J, Kim JE, Won W, Bae S, Renshaw PF.
Author information
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

Antidepressants targeting monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems, despite their immediate effects at the synaptic level, usually require several weeks of administration to achieve clinical efficacy. The authors propose a strategy of adding creatine monohydrate (creatine) to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Such augmentation may lead to a more rapid onset of antidepressant effects and a greater treatment response, potentially by restoring brain bioenergetics at the cellular level.
METHOD:

Fifty-two women with major depressive disorder were enrolled in an 8-week double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial and randomly assigned to receive escitalopram in addition to either creatine (5 g/day, N=25) or placebo (N=27). Efficacy was primarily assessed by changes in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score.
RESULTS:

In comparison to the placebo augmentation group, patients receiving creatine augmentation showed significantly greater improvements in HAM-D score, as early as week 2 of treatment. This differential improvement favoring creatine was maintained at weeks 4 and 8. There were no differences between treatment groups in the proportion of patients who discontinued treatment prematurely (creatine: N=8, 32.0%; placebo: N=5, 18.5%) or in the overall frequency of all reported adverse events (creatine: 36 events; placebo: 45 events).
CONCLUSIONS:

The current study suggests that creatine augmentation of SSRI treatment may be a promising therapeutic approach that exhibits more rapid and efficacious responses in women with major depressive disorder.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2286 ... t=Abstract
Avatar de Usuario
Fisio
Administrador del Sitio
 
Mensajes: 6124
Registrado: Dom, 01 Sep 2013, 14:18

Re: Creatina en la tercera edad

Notapor Fisio » Jue, 26 Mar 2015, 20:53

Más masa ósea
Creatine monohydrate and resistance training increase bone mineral content and density in older men.
Chilibeck PD1, Chrusch MJ, Chad KE, Shawn Davison K, Burke DG.
Author information
Abstract

Our purpose was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation combined with resistance training on bone mineral content and density in older men. Twenty-nine older men (age 71 y) were randomized (double blind) to receive creatine (0.3 g/kg creatine for 5 d and 0.07 g/kg thereafter) or placebo while participating in resistance training (12 weeks). Bone mineral content and density were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after training. There was a time main effect for whole-body and leg bone mineral density (p < or = 0.05) with these measures increasing by approximately 0.5%, and 1%, respectively in the combined groups. There was a group by time interaction for arms bone mineral content, with the group receiving creatine increasing by 3.2% (p < 0.01) and the group receiving placebo decreasing by 1.0% (not significant). Changes in lean tissue mass of the arms correlated with changes in bone mineral content of the arms (r = 0.67; p < 0.01). Resistance training of 12 weeks increases bone mineral density in older men and creatine supplementation may provide an additional benefit for increasing regional bone mineral content. The increase in bone mineral content may be due to an enhanced muscle mass with creatine, with potentially greater tension on bone at sites of muscle attachment.
Avatar de Usuario
Fisio
Administrador del Sitio
 
Mensajes: 6124
Registrado: Dom, 01 Sep 2013, 14:18

Re: Creatina en la tercera edad

Notapor Fisio » Lun, 06 Abr 2015, 03:53

La creatina revierte la pérdida ósea en mujeres postmenopáusicas. Intuyo que el entrenamiento fue bastante malo y habrían obtenido mejores resultados con una dieta hiperprotéica.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014 Nov 10.
Effects of creatine and resistance training on bone health in postmenopausal women.
Chilibeck PD1, Candow DG, Landeryou T, Kaviani M, Paus-Jenssen L.

PURPOSE:

Our primary purpose was to determine the effect of 12 months of creatine (Cr) supplementation during a supervised resistance training program on properties of bone in postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

Participants were randomized (double blind) to two groups: resistance training (3d·wk) and Cr supplementation (0.1g[BULLET OPERATOR]kg·d) or resistance training and placebo (Pl). Our primary outcome measures were lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD). Secondary outcome measures were total hip, and whole-body BMD, bone geometric properties at the hip, speed of sound at the distal radius and tibia, whole-body lean tissue mass, muscle thickness, and bench press and hack squat strength. Forty-seven women (57 SD 6y; n=23 Cr; n=24 Pl) were randomized with 33 analyzed after 12 months (n=15 Cr; n=18 Pl).

RESULTS:

Cr attenuated the rate of femoral neck BMD loss (-1.2%; absolute change [95% Confidence Interval] = -0.01 [-0.025, 0.005] g/cm) compared to Pl (-3.9%; -0.03 [-0.044, -0.017] g/cm, p<0.05) and also increased femoral shaft subperiosteal width, a predictor of bone bending strength (Cr: +0.04 [-0.09, 0.16] cm); Pl (-0.12 [-0.23, -0.01] cm; p<0.05). Cr increased relative bench press strength more than Pl (64% vs. 34%; p<0.05). There were no differences between groups for other outcome measures. There were no differences between groups for reports of serum liver enzyme abnormalities, and creatinine clearance was normal for Cr participants throughout the intervention.

CONCLUSION:

Twelve months of creatine supplementation during a resistance training program preserves femoral neck BMD and increases femoral shaft superiosteal width, a predictor of bone bending strength, in postmenopausal women.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25386713
Avatar de Usuario
Fisio
Administrador del Sitio
 
Mensajes: 6124
Registrado: Dom, 01 Sep 2013, 14:18

Re: Creatina en la tercera edad

Notapor Fisio » Lun, 06 Abr 2015, 21:21

Exp Gerontol. 2014 May;53:7-15. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2014.02.003. Epub 2014 Feb 13.
Creatine supplementation and resistance training in vulnerable older women: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.
Gualano B1, Macedo AR2, Alves CR2, Roschel H1, Benatti FB3, Takayama L2, de Sá Pinto AL2, Lima FR2, Pereira RM4.
Author information
Abstract

This study aimed to examine the efficacy of creatine supplementation, associated or not with resistance training, in vulnerable older women. A 24-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was performed. Sixty subjects were assigned to compose the following groups: placebo (PL), creatine supplementation (CR), placebo with resistance training (PL+RT), and creatine supplementation with resistance training (CR+RT). The subjects were assessed at baseline and after 24weeks. The primary outcome was muscle strength, as assessed by one-repetition maximum (1-RM) tests. Secondary outcomes included appendicular lean mass, bone mass, biochemical bone markers, and physical function tests. The changes in 1-RM leg press were significantly greater in the CR+RT group (+19.9%) than in the PL (+2.4%) and the CR groups (+3.7%), but not than in the PL+RT group (+15%) (p=0.002, p=0.002, and p=0.357, respectively). The CR+RT group showed superior gains in 1-RM bench press (+10%) when compared with all the other groups (p≤0.05). The CR+RT group (+1.31%) showed greater appendicular lean mass accrual than the PL (-1.2%), the CR (+0.3%), and the PL+RT groups (-0.2%) (p≤0.05). The CR and the PL+RT groups experienced comparable gains in appendicular lean mass (p=0.62), but superior to those seen in the PL group. Changes in fat mass, bone mass and serum bone markers did not significantly differ between the groups (p>0.05). In conclusion, creatine supplementation combined with resistance training improved appendicular lean mass and muscle function, but not bone mass, in older vulnerable women. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01472393.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24530883





Eur J Appl Physiol. 2013 Apr;113(4):987-96. doi: 10.1007/s00421-012-2514-6. Epub 2012 Oct 7.
Long-term creatine supplementation improves muscular performance during resistance training in older women.
Aguiar AF1, Januário RS, Junior RP, Gerage AM, Pina FL, do Nascimento MA, Padovani CR, Cyrino ES.
Author information
Abstract

This study examined the effects of long-term creatine supplementation combined with resistance training (RT) on the one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength, motor functional performance (e.g., 30-s chair stand, arm curl, and getting up from lying on the floor tests) and body composition (e.g., fat-free mass, muscle mass, and % body fat using DEXA scans) in older women. Eighteen healthy women (64.9 ± 5.0 years) were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to either a creatine (CR, N = 9) or placebo (PL, N = 9) group. Both groups underwent a 12-week RT program (3 days week(-1)), consuming an equivalent amount of either creatine (5.0 g day(-1)) or placebo (maltodextrin). After 12 week, the CR group experienced a greater (P < 0.05) increase (Δ%) in training volume (+164.2), and 1RM bench press (+5.1), knee extension (+3.9) and biceps curl (+8.8) performance than the PL group. Furthermore, CR group gained significantly more fat-free mass (+3.2) and muscle mass (+2.8) and were more efficient in performing submaximal-strength functional tests than the PL group. No changes (P > 0.05) in body mass or % body fat were observed from pre- to post-test in either group. These results indicate that long-term creatine supplementation combined with RT improves the ability to perform submaximal-strength functional tasks and promotes a greater increase in maximal strength, fat-free mass and muscle mass in older women.



http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23053133
Avatar de Usuario
Fisio
Administrador del Sitio
 
Mensajes: 6124
Registrado: Dom, 01 Sep 2013, 14:18

Re: Creatina en la tercera edad

Notapor bunkxl » Mar, 21 Abr 2015, 10:27

Hola buenas me llamo Javier, queria preguntar, tengo el menisco roto, me hablaron que tomara suplemento colageno +acido hiluronico, que opinais al respecto, gracias un saludo desde málaga..



Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
bunkxl
 
Mensajes: 1
Registrado: Mar, 21 Abr 2015, 10:22

Re: Creatina en la tercera edad

Notapor Fisio » Sab, 25 Abr 2015, 11:35

Ahi lo más importante es como entrenar la rodilla, y ver que deportes haces etc.
Avatar de Usuario
Fisio
Administrador del Sitio
 
Mensajes: 6124
Registrado: Dom, 01 Sep 2013, 14:18


Volver a Muscleblog

¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 5 invitados